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The Civil Rights Movement Of The 1960'S

The Cold War acted as catalyst to Civil Rights

❶Yet African Americans found themselves on the margins of wartime prosperity. Army veteran Robert F.

Jim Crow Violence

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Davarian L. Baldwin – Trinity College

Introduction The civil rights movement was a movement in the United States in the s to the s and mainly led by Blacks in an effort to establish gender and racial equality for all the African Americans. The aim of this civil right movement was to eliminate racial discrimination, restore economic and political self-sufficiency and to gain freedom from oppression from the white Americans Newman, The movement had several leaders but the two notable figures were Dr.

Martin Luther King Jr. Civil Rights Movement Born in , Dr. King was fortunate to have had a teacher as a mother who taught her to read before starting school.

Martin Luther became one of the extraordinary civil right movement leaders who advocated for racial integration between the white and African Americans to free the blacks from the oppression that they faced from the white Americans. King advocated for civil disobedience, the nonviolent resistance against unjust laws, and he believed that nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it Brunner, ; Riches, King preached nonviolence that entailed peaceful dissents, mass demos, strikes, economic g-slows, marches and voter registration causes to express their frustrations with the laws that they regarded as unjust-as opposed to violence-to gain their rights.

King's movements were intended to force the improvement of policies and laws that were unjust. These peaceful protests and demonstrations were however met with violence, apprehensions, detainments, and even drubbings to death from the racists with a claim that it would lead to anarchy. The peaceful boycotts of Montgomery buses by African Americans were sustained for more than a year and eventually bore fruits when the supreme courts declared racial segregation in the buses and separate educational facilities illegal and unequal.

Milam, kidnapped and brutally murdered Till, dumping his body in the Tallahatchie River. Voting Rights When Reconstruction ended in , states across the South implemented new laws to restrict the voting rights of African Americans. These included onerous requirements of owning property, paying poll taxes, and passing literacy or civics exams. Many African Americans who attempted to vote were also threatened physically or feared losing their jobs.

One of the major goals of the Civil Rights Movement was to Women in the Civil Rights Movement Many women played important roles in the Civil Rights Movement, from leading local civil rights organizations to serving as lawyers on school segregation lawsuits. Their efforts to lead the movement were often overshadowed by men, who still get more attention and credit for its successes in popular historical narratives and commemorations.

Many women experienced gender discrimination and sexual harassment within the movement and later Youth in the Civil Rights Movement At its height in the s, the Civil Rights Movement drew children, teenagers, and young adults into a maelstrom of meetings, marches, violence, and in some cases, imprisonment.

White southern resistance to Brown was formidable and the slow pace of change stimulated impatience especially among younger African Americans as the s began. They concluded that they could not wait for change—they had to make it. And the Montgomery Bus Boycott , which lasted the entire year of , had demonstrated that mass direct action could indeed work. The four college students from Greensboro who sat at the Woolworth lunch counter set off a decade of activity and organizing that would kill Jim Crow.

The March on Washington, most often remembered as the event at which Dr. Movement activists from SNCC and CORE asked sharp questions about the exclusive nature of American democracy and advocated solutions to the disfranchisement and violation of the human rights of African Americans, including Dr.

King called for a guaranteed annual income, redistribution of the national wealth to meet human needs, and an end to a war to colonize the Vietnamese. Malcolm X proposed to internationalize the black American freedom struggle and to link it with liberation movements in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Thus the Civil Rights Movement of the s and s was not concerned exclusively with interracial cooperation or segregation and discrimination as a character issue. Rather, as in earlier decades, the prize was a redefinition of American society and a redistribution of social and economic power.

For example, they will question whether President Kennedy sincerely believed in racial equality when he supported civil rights or only did so out of political expediency.

Or they may ask how whites could be so cruel as to attack peaceful and dignified demonstrators. Leading productive discussions that consider broader issues will likely have to involve debunking some conventional wisdom about the Civil Rights Movement. Guiding students to discuss the extent to which nonviolence and racial integration were considered within the movement to be hallowed goals can lead them to greater insights.

Nonviolence and passive resistance were prominent tactics of protesters and organizations. But they were not the only ones, and the number of protesters who were ideologically committed to them was relatively small.

Although the name of one of the important civil rights organizations was the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, its members soon concluded that advocating nonviolence as a principle was irrelevant to most African Americans they were trying to reach. Movement participants in Mississippi, for example, did not decide beforehand to engage in violence, but self-defense was simply considered common sense.

If some SNCC members in Mississippi were convinced pacifists in the face of escalating violence, they nevertheless enjoyed the protection of local people who shared their goals but were not yet ready to beat their swords into ploughshares. Armed self-defense had been an essential component of the black freedom struggle, and it was not confined to the fringe.

Returning soldiers fought back against white mobs during the Red Summer of In , World War Two veterans likewise protected black communities in places like Columbia, Tennessee, the site of a bloody race riot.

Army veteran Robert F. Students should be encouraged to consider why activists may have considered violence a necessary part of their work and what role it played in their overall programs. Are violence and nonviolence necessarily antithetical, or can they be complementary? For example the Black Panther Party may be best remembered by images of members clad in leather and carrying rifles, but they also challenged widespread police brutality, advocated reform of the criminal justice system, and established community survival programs, including medical clinics, schools, and their signature breakfast program.

One question that can lead to an extended discussion is to ask students what the difference is between people who rioted in the s and advocated violence and the participants in the Boston Tea Party at the outset of the American Revolution.

Both groups wanted out from oppression, both saw that violence could be efficacious, and both were excoriated by the rulers of their day. Teachers and students can then explore reasons why those Boston hooligans are celebrated in American history and whether the same standards should be applied to those who used arms in the s.

An important goal of the Civil Rights Movement was the elimination of segregation. But if students, who are now a generation or more removed from Jim Crow, are asked to define segregation, they are likely to point out examples of individual racial separation such as blacks and whites eating at different cafeteria tables and the existence of black and white houses of worship.

Yet segregation was a social, political, and economic system that placed African Americans in an inferior position, disfranchised them, and was enforced by custom, law, and official and vigilante violence.

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- The civil right movement refers to the reform movement in the United States beginning in the to led primarily by Blacks for outlawing racial discrimination against African-Americans to prove the civil rights of personal Black citizen.

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The Civil Rights Movement Essay - Historically, the Civil Rights Movement was a time during the ’s and 60’s to eliminate segregation and gain equal rights. Looking back on all the events, and dynamic figures it produced, this description is very vague.

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The Civil Rights Movement Essay Words | 5 Pages. The civil rights movement was a span of time when the African Americans endeavor was to acquire their constitutional rights of which they were being deprived. A commendable bearing of the civil rights movement was the unachievable triumph that the blacks sought after and built. The Civil Rights Movement Of The 'S In the history of the United States there have been many social changes that have occurred. The Civil Rights Movement of the ’s was one of the most significant and important for the equality of all people.

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The Civil Rights Movement Essay Words | 4 Pages. The ’s were a time of freedom, deliverance, developing and molding for African-American people all over the United States. The Civil Rights Movement consisted of . Custom Civil Rights Movement Essay Writing Service || Civil Rights Movement Essay samples, help Introduction The civil rights movement was a movement in the United States in the s to the s and mainly led by Blacks in an effort to establish gender and racial equality for all the African Americans.