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What Is Your Democracy Essay

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what is your democracy essay

There are lots of governments in the world which are trying their best to promote a sense of democracy for their nationals. Obviously, we can find that there are still some areas in Hong Kong where we cannot have freedom, such as freedom of speech, freedom of press, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and so on. In order to make such a ch. An intimidated, uninformed and disinterested public would. More than 20 years have passed since the end of the Cold War.

Democracy is growing in many individual countries. Yet it remains to be seen if it can in fact manage to take root inside the Russian Federation. The negative stability of the Cold War era has given way to an increased number of regional conflicts, some old, some new. A number of them have become real terrorism threats for the rest of.

A liberal democracy is a system of governing a country. It is one in which the citizens of the country have total freedom and equality. In a liberal democracy, the legislature, executive and the judiciary are kept separate to avoid power resting in one place. There are many features which make up a liberal democracy, these are. Elections they must be free and fair, there must be a choice of politi. Elections form the foundation of democracy.

They are the central institution of democratic representative governments. It is not only legal but also a moral responsibility of a democratic nation to hold free and fair elections. It is true that all modern democracies hold elections.

But, at the same time, it is also true that all elections are not democratic. Athenian democracy developed in the Greek city state of Athens, comprising the central city Tate of Athens and the surrounding territory of Attica, around BC. Athens was one of the very first known democracies although anthropological research suggests that democratic forms were likely common in stateless societies long before the rise of Athens.

Other Greek cities set up democracies, most b. Burke was also perturbed by the democratic aspirations of the French revolution, in particular by the doctrines of popular sovereignty and general will. He regarded democracy as the "most shameless thing in the world".

He was skeptical of the political ability of the ordinary people. He was an elitist, totally unconcerned about the plight of the; masses. For him, the best form of political prac.

Tocqueville disliked revolutions, at the same time he offered a balanced view. He conceded that "while one great revolution may establish liberty in a country, several revolutions in succession make orderly liberty impossible there for a longtime". He disliked the reign of terror and despotism of the French Revolution. This word is democracy. I bet you will hear it at least times within an hour. Politicians use it to evaluate the domestic and foreign policies of their neighbors, opponents, and allies.

Simultaneously, it is obvious that in many cases, this word is misunderstood, as well as used for manipulation. Why has it become the cornerstone of modern civilization? Democracy can be understood as a process of people governing their state and managing community affairs based on consensus Howards Though democracy is often defined as a form of government, to my mind, it is more reasonable to contemplate it as a process, a constant opportunity by which citizens may bring changes into their social and political life.

The origins of democracy lie in Ancient Greece. This term was constructed from two Greek words: Greek democracy was direct—not only in the sense that citizens could vote for decisions personally, but also in the sense that they could control the political process and the authorities. It must be pointed out that back then, not everyone could take part in voting—this privilege was only available to male citizens.

Slaves—and ancient Greece was a slavery state—and women could not affect social and political life George This led to a representative democracy—the model which is used all over the world today. It may be constitutional, parliamentary, or presidential—the main feature is that people affect political life through the representatives they have chosen through elections Howards A precise definition of democracy might be had by consulting the OED.

Democracy is government by the people; a form of government in which the sovereign power resides in the people as a whole, and is exercised either directly by them as in the small republics of antiquity or by officers elected by them.

In modern use it vaguely denotes a social state in which all have equal rights, without hereditary or arbitrary differences of rank or privilege. Walter Bagehot gave it a more uncelestial definition: It is from the suffix, "-ocracy" by which we might determine the operative meaning of the larger word, "democracy"; it is the indicator of the dominant, superior, or aspiring class who would rule; it is derived from the Greek word kratos , meaning strength or power.

Any word might be added to this suffix, which will then indicate the type of rule, such as: Democracy is the rule by, or the dominion of, the people; it comes from the Greek word, demos. It is often referred to as popular government. Democracy, historically speaking, is to be compared with monarchy, rule of one; or with aristocracy, rule of the "best-born," or rule of the nobles.

Whatever its origins and we will consider its origins democracy has come to mean a principle or system to which most all political parties of the western world, no matter their political beliefs, would subscribe. It goes beyond the periodic act of voting; it is characterized by participation in government, viz. In his capacity as a history writer, Aristotle , in his work, The Athenian Constitution BC , writes that the Athenians practiced democracy only to the extent of putting and keeping in power members of a very exclusive group, a group which formed but a minority in the universal group we stylize as society.

The Athenian constitution was oligarchical, in every respect. The poorer classes were the serfs of the rich. They cultivated the lands of the rich and paid rent.

The whole country was in the hands of nine magistrates, called archons , who were elected according to qualifications of birth and wealth. These ruling magistrates held their positions for life, except for that latter period when they served for a term of ten years. In time, this Greek notion of democracy was set aside in favour of the draw. Grecian democracy, however, such as it was, was soon covered over with the murk of the middle ages.

Democracy's re-flowering in the world, in respect to the rights of the people, first appeared in England with the Glorious Revolution of A study of an era known as The Enlightenment, is the study of the beginnings of of modern democracy 5. The enlightenment was fully established and growing vigorously by the eighteenth century. As the shackles of oppression, so firmly clamped on during the middle ages, became loose, men sought to apply reason to religion, politics, morality, and social life.

With the coming of the enlightenment men began to express their minds; no longer were most all men cowed by the great mystery of the universe, and, their minds, through ignorance, ruled by fears: The Enlightenment was a time when human beings pulled themselves out of the medieval pits of mysticism.

It was a spontaneous and defused movement which fed on itself and led to the great scientific discoveries from which we all benefit today. Beliefs in natural law and universal order sprung up, which not only promoted scientific findings and advancements of a material nature; but, which, also drove the great political thinkers of the time, such as: The people, of all things, were refusing to pay taxes and they were becoming belligerent. Edward was getting advise to the effect that it might be better to sit down with the people, or rather their representatives, than to let loose the royal troops.

Letting the troops loose would be an act which would destroy the country's riches, a share of which the king wanted for himself. Thus, we would have seen the royal messenger riding out from the king's castle to deliver this royal writ to the sheriff of Northhampton.

This royal writ of Edward's had the Latin words, elegi facis , meaning that the persons who were to sit on the people's Council the beginnings of parliament were to be elected headmen such as the burgesses and knights, and they were to have "full and sufficient power for themselves and the communities" which they represent; they were to come to Council -- ready, to conduct and to conclude the important business of the land.

Now, one of the most fundamental questions of politics - whether of , or of modern day - is this: Should the representative, sent to the legislature -- assuming, in the first place, that he or she has canvassed the subject to be voted upon and all the far flung consequences of it -- vote the way the majority of his constituents would have him vote; or, should he vote on the basis of what he thinks is right, no matter that it may run against the majority of what his constituents would like.

Edmund Burke , a most brilliant political thinker, thought that the representative should vote his conscience. It should be remembered, too, that any decision made and action taken in an assembly of "our" representatives can be done on the barest majority of a group; which might have been elected on the barest majority of a popular vote; which majority of a popular vote, might well, and usually does, represent a minority of the population.

How can it ever be stated that any particular government measure will accord with the wishes of the majority? Such people in these earlier centuries existed in predominate numbers. Sadly, yet today, even as the 21st century dawns, it is rare, even in the western democracies, to find many people who are independently working through for themselves and taking fixed positions on important political concepts such as democracy, freedom and government.

For democracy to work there must, as a prerequisite, be a people educated and be a people ready to inform themselves of the great issues which face them. Unfortunately, a politically educated public, this important ingredient to the proper working of democracy, is missing. First off, it must be recognized, that the country is not run, at least not in between elections, with the executive checking with the people by way of referenda as the Swiss do. However, the people who possess government power and who would like to keep it, are bound to proceed on the basis of popular opinion; the difficulty is that public opinion arises as a result of an agenda which is set by minority groups to which vote chasing politicians cow, a process which is generally aided and abetted by an ignorant press.

Like a fish to water, democracy can only exists in a total atmosphere of freedom of action; it is completely incompatible with a system that provides for a governing authority with coercive power. If one accepts anarchists, for example, do not that a government, to some extent or other, is necessary for a civilized society, then it is to be recognized that the business of governing as apart from the business of electing representatives cannot be conducted in democratic matter.

Lippmann deals with this problem: Our government experts must be cross-examined and asked if they have any interest in the outcome? The answer is that most of them do -- if, for no other reason, than they are in the pay of the government, as either; bureaucrats, lodged in the upper end of the government echelon; or those resting in publicly funded universities; or those who are in the social welfare business. The result of the syndrome is predictable, for, as the public conflict grows, people come to doubt expert pronouncements.

Normally people primarily judge the propositions before them in a most obvious way, by their source.

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Short Essay On Democracy What is your democracy essay It Just so Happened New broom sweeps clean essay Nicholas Walker What is democracy essay However, as Sir Winston Churchill had said once: “Democracy is the worst form of government except for all those others that have been tried.” References George, Essay marking service Free Democracy Essays and Papers – helpme Free Democracy .

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Feb 14,  · Democracy is not a government; it is a way of thinking, a responsibility. In a democracy there is no corruption in power because it is a transparent system: the governing doctrine states that citizens have the right to access the documents and proceedings of the government, which allows for effective public oversight.

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Democracy essays Democracy is almost everywhere in the world. Europe has used its form of government for almost half a century. North and South America are now virtually a hemisphere of democracy; Africa is experiencing democratic reform; and new, democracies have taken root in Asia. Democracy is considered to be the optimal way to run the state, however many critics talk about democratic tyranny and even the injustice of this form of government (Howards 56). Imagine that in a presidential election, 49% of the electorate vote for one candidate, and 51% vote for another.

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Countries that are yet to adopt democracy need to consider it. It will ensure respect of people’s opinions as opposed to dictatorial tendencies as it is in the other forms of governments. If you are looking for help with your essay? Get professional essay writing help from Z Essay writing service: any discipline, any level and complexity. The forthcoming essay will compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of democracy in comparison to other forms of government, and attempt to answer Churchill’s proclamation as to why democracy is unsurpassed so far.