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How to Write a Research Paper

Writing a Career Research Paper

❶Any unnecessary or repetitious words?

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Some students use a particular index card method throughout the process of researching and writing that allows them great flexibility in organizing and re-organizing as well as in keeping track of sources; others color-code or otherwise identify groups of facts.

Use any method that works for you in later drafting your paper, but always start with good recordkeeping. Mind map or outline Based on your preliminary reading, draw up a working mind map or outline. Include any important, interesting, or provocative points, including your own ideas about the topic. A mind map is less linear and may even include questions you want to find answers to.

Use the method that works best for you. The object is simply to group ideas in logically related groups. You may revise this mind map or outline at any time; it is much easier to reorganize a paper by crossing out or adding sections to a mind map or outline than it is to laboriously start over with the writing itself.

Focus and craftsmanship Write a well defined, focused, three- to five-point thesis statement, but be prepared to revise it later if necessary. Take your time crafting this statement into one or two sentences, for it will control the direction and development of your entire paper. Facts and examples Now begin your heavy-duty research. Try the internet, electronic databases, reference books, newspaper articles, and books for a balance of sources. For each source, write down on an index card or on a separate page of your notebook the publication information you will need for your works cited MLA or bibliography APA page.

Write important points, details, and examples, always distinguishing between direct quotes and paraphrasing. As you read, remember that an expert opinion is more valid than a general opinion, and for some topics in science and history, for example , more recent research may be more valuable than older research.

Avoid relying too heavily on internet sources, which vary widely in quality and authority and sometimes even disappear before you can complete your paper. Never copy-and-paste from internet sources directly into any actual draft of your paper. For more information on plagiarism, obtain from the Butte College Student Services office a copy of the college's policy on plagiarism, or attend the Critical Skills Plagiarism Workshop given each semester.

Matching mind map and thesis After you have read deeply and gathered plenty of information, expand or revise your working mind map or outline by adding information, explanations, and examples. Aim for balance in developing each of your main points they should be spelled out in your thesis statement. Return to the library for additional information if it is needed to evenly develop these points, or revise your thesis statement to better reflect what you have learned or the direction your paper seems to have taken.

Beginning in the middle Write the body of the paper, starting with the thesis statement and omitting for now the introduction unless you already know exactly how to begin, but few writers do. Use supporting detail to logically and systematically validate your thesis statement.

For now, omit the conclusion also. Organization and attribution Read, revise, and make sure that your ideas are clearly organized and that they support your thesis statement.

Every single paragraph should have a single topic that is derived from the thesis statement. If any paragraph does not, take it out, or revise your thesis if you think it is warranted. Check that you have quoted and paraphrased accurately, and that you have acknowledged your sources even for your paraphrasing. Every single idea that did not come to you as a personal epiphany or as a result of your own methodical reasoning should be attributed to its owner.

Intro, conclusion, and citations Write the final draft. Add a one-paragraph introduction and a one-paragraph conclusion. When I was in high school, I wanted to be a pipe maker. I followed your steps on how to write a career research paper. As I followed the process I realized that being a pipe maker could lead to compromising public photos, so I became an Olympic swimmer instead. If the process of writing research papers can help Michael, it can help you.

I now share with you my How to Write a Career Research Paper lesson plan, a lesson plan with a limitless number of English research paper topics. The introduction of the research paper should include information about the writer and his or her interests.

The body should examine the responsibilities, education requirements, potential salary, and employment outlook of a specific career.

The conclusion should summarize what was learned. A successful career paper should:. As with all essays, the process for writing a research paper begins with prewriting:. Include information about yourself--your goals, interests, talents-- in the introduction. Be sure to end the introduction with a declarative sentence about the career you chose for the topic of your paper. In the body of your paper, present important information with commentary. Discuss the positives, negative, and skills you will need to improve to excel in this career.

Be sure to discuss post secondary requirements, if any, and which schools offer the best programs. When revising, use the following questions to make sure you covered what you need to cover:.

Here's a testimonial from a former student: Thanks, Michael If the process of writing research papers can help Michael, it can help you. The Basics The introduction of the research paper should include information about the writer and his or her interests.

A successful career paper should: Prewriting As with all essays, the process for writing a research paper begins with prewriting: Brainstorm careers as a class: Think of all the people you've talked to in the last 24 hours and jot down their career. What careers appeal to you? What careers do you think you'd be good at? Skim the classified ads.


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This method eases the reader into the substance of your paper by providing a memorable and relevant story or a quotation from a well-known person or work. Pick something that is engaging in its own right, but that also creates a connection to your research paper's central thesis.

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Writing a research paper is a challenge for many high school and college students. One of the biggest hang-ups many students have is getting started. Finding a topic and doing the research may be half the battle, but putting words to paper or starting an introduction often proves to be an intimidating task.

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What is a research paper? A research paper is a piece of academic writing based on its author’s original research on a particular topic, and the analysis and interpretation of the research findings. It can be either a term paper, a master’s thesis or a doctoral dissertation. This Chapter outlines the logical steps to writing a good research paper. A research paper is different from an essay because a research paper is an extended anlysis based on data and evidence Establishing a strong, authoritative tone in your research paper means.

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As such, they need help in starting a research paper. Basically, if you need to know how to start a research paper, you have to start by knowing how to write the first sentences. This is because these first sentences play a very important role of grabbing the attention of your audience. This is very area specific. I'll start with the caveat that I write papers in computer science, so YMMV. The way I think about introductions (which is not to say they are GOOD introductions) is that they tell the story of the paper in brief.